One of the world’s greatest tourist sites in danger

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One of the world’s greatest tourist sites in danger

Caitlyn Hayden, Reporter

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Venice, Italy, is in grave danger of being wrecked. The beautiful, unique city has been flooding on and off since midway through the twentieth century. Based on a system of small rivers and canals, water is continuously running through every area in Venice.
In Venice, there are no cars; instead, there are boats that cart the habitants and tourists around. Though this system is creative and an anomaly of the typical transportation systems, it is also proving to be dangerous. Also, the habitants of the city rely on the system, and with the constant flooding, they have no choice but to stay inside.
On top of all the devastating consequences, the vast and admirable history within the city is also at risk of being destroyed. St. Mark’s Square was under eight inches of water, and in other areas, water levels reach as high as six feet. These frightening water levels could leak into the extremely old churches full of historical artwork and literary pieces and damage the priceless works of the past.
For example, Saint Mark’s Basilica on St. Mark’s Square is in peril. About 925 years old, this church is one of Italy’s most priceless and remarkable wonders. Inside, there are many relics and intricate mosaics that cover the interior. Also, the remains of Saint Mark himself are found inside of the incredible church.
Venice is also very well known for its interesting and fun trademark of gondola rides. These rides are peaceful and take tourists around the city along the waterways- the true Venetian experience is lived through these rides. With the flooding, the unique boat trips have not been available. This puts Venice at risk because without their main tourist attractions being accessible, they may lose revenue that comes through tourism.
The flooding has overall impacted Venice very negatively, and there have been no signs of the flooding coming to an end. There are also no ways to expiate the lost funds from tourists, and Venice’s main source of income could be put at risk too.